The 45-year-old survivor of the coronavirus reveals how long Covid has...

A coronavirus survivor spoke about the long-term effects of the virus on her life.

Roweena Russell, 45, of North Shields, showed early symptoms of the coronavirus on April 9 as she struggled to catch her breath and felt exhausted.

Over the next few days, she began to experience memory loss, vomiting, and constant dizziness before becoming so exhausted and having to call an ambulance for help.

The avid cyclist Roweena Russell, 45, from North Shields, suffers from the consequences of “Long Covid” – she has difficulty walking long distances, although she is in the highest physical fitness before Covid

Now, six months later, Roweena suffers from long-term symptoms of the coronavirus that have changed her life despite having no underlying health problems.

The 45-year-old said: “Before Covid I was really healthy. I used to be able to do handstands and cartwheels, and I cycled over 60 miles on a regular basis, and it only took me 10 minutes to recover.

Last week I took 6,000 steps, most of what I have been able to take since the virus first appeared, and it took me three days to recover.

“My brain is badly affected and is now barely functioning.

Before and after Roweena Russell's hands that have changed due to inflammation after the coronavirus

Before and after Roweena Russell's hands that have changed due to inflammation after the coronavirus

Before and after Roweena Russell’s hands that have changed due to inflammation after the coronavirus

Who is most likely to have long Covid?

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London, heads the Covid Symptoms Study published in July.

In a BMJ panel discussion, he said that according to data, Long Covid is about twice as common in women as it is in men.

He added that the average age of people who presented themselves with it was about four years older than those who had what is known as a “short covid.”

“I find it really difficult to concentrate and concentrate. I am so exhausted and just feel exhausted.

“Every day that I have chest and kidney pain, my heart rate is everywhere and I can taste blood in my mouth all the time, which makes me sick all the time.

“I had inflammation in my hands and feet and my hands have now changed their shape and I had to completely change my diet as all the white carbohydrates leave me in agony now.”

Roweena woke up at 4 a.m. in September, fearful for her life from suffering severe chest pain before being rushed to the hospital with symptoms of a heart attack.

She has been in pain every day since then and recently had her heart and lungs tested to determine the damage caused by the virus.

Roweena is now nervously waiting for her results to come back and be unable to work due to her symptoms. Along with thousands of other people affected, she is worried about the future.

She added, “I am more concerned that this may be my life and that I may slowly die from complications of sudden cardiac arrest.

Roweena is in pain every day and was recently tested on her heart and lungs to determine the damage caused by the virus

Roweena is in pain every day and was recently tested on her heart and lungs to determine the damage caused by the virus

Roweena is in pain every day and was recently tested on her heart and lungs to determine the damage caused by the virus

Roweena fears that her new low level of fitness will affect her life forever

Roweena fears that her new low level of fitness will affect her life forever

Roweena fears that her new low level of fitness will affect her life forever

“My bigger concern is how this will affect the people around me.

“Will I be able to live independently because I couldn’t now? “Would I be able to train again and ever feel healthy again?

“Doctors and staff at the front face me better now. They used to know nothing about ‘Long Covid’ and we were the first cases, but now they have listened and taken the time to understand the condition.

“There are a number of young and previously healthy people who just don’t feel better after seven months.”

Although many people have battled the deadly coronavirus, tens of thousands of survivors struggle with long-term symptoms that plague them months later.

From persistent fatigue, shortness of breath, memory loss, poor concentration to muscle, joint and chest pain – a study by King’s College in London has found that up to 60,000 people have been suffering in the UK for over three months.

And although the disease known as “Long Covid” may not be officially recognized, it is gaining increasing recognition.

WHAT ARE THE LONG-TERM SYMPTOMS OF COVID-19?

Most coronavirus patients recover within 14 days, have a fever, cough, and lose their sense of smell or taste for several days.

However, there are early signs that the virus’s tell-tale symptoms may linger for weeks in long-distance drivers – the term used for patients plagued by persistent complications.

Data from the COVID Symptom Study App from King’s College London and healthcare company Zoe suggests that one in ten people will still have symptoms after three weeks and some may suffer for months.

Long term symptoms include:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • breathlessness
  • Increased heart rate
  • Delusions
  • Strokes
  • insomnia
  • Loss of taste / smell
  • Kidney disease
  • Mobility problems
  • a headache
  • Muscle aches
  • fever

In patients with more severe illness, Italian researchers who followed 143 people hospitalized with the disease found that nearly 90 percent still had symptoms such as fatigue two months after the initial discomfort.

The most common complaints were fatigue, shortness of breath and joint pain, all of which have been reported in the fight against the disease.

Another study in Italy found that one in ten people who lose their sense of taste and smell with the coronavirus, now recognized as a key sign of infection, may not get it back within a month.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, enrolled 187 Italians who had the virus but were not sick enough to be hospitalized.

UK Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said the longer-term health effects of Covid-19 could be “significant”.

Support groups like Long Covid have popped up online for those who “suspected Covid-19 and your experience doesn’t follow the symptoms of the textbook or recovery time”.

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