Usain Bolt's amazing race, the slowest swimmer in Olympic history and football's biggest win: Incredible records which will never be broken

Usain Bolt's amazing race, the slowest swimmer in Olympic history and football's biggest win: Incredible records which will never be broken
Usain Bolt's amazing race, the slowest swimmer in Olympic history and football's biggest win: Incredible records which will never be broken

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Hind Al Soulia - Riyadh - Swimming: slowest winner in 100m freestyle - 1 minute, 52.72 seconds. At the 2000 Olympics, Eric Moussambani from the Equatorial Guinea became a sensation. Moussambani, who had never seen an Olympic-sized swimming pool before and had been training for just eight months, swam his 100m freestyle heat in a record slow time of 1:52.72 after the other two swimmers in his heat were disqualified for false starts. He won the heat but his time was too slow to advance to the next round. It was the slowest time in Olympic history and more than 50 seconds behind the slowest swimmer of the rest of the heats. Eric ''the Eel'' became a legend. Allsport

Athletics: fastest 100m final in Olympics - 2012 London Games. Usain Bolt won the 100m final with a stunning time of 9.63 seconds. But it was what happened behind him that stood out. Yohan Blake finished second in 9.75s and Justin Gatlin won bronze in 9.79s. It was the first time that the top three finished under 9.8s, the first time that the top five finished in under 9.9s. Seven of the eight men ran in under 10 seconds, with only Asafa Powell finishing outside that time after an injury 60 metres into the race. Alamy Stock Photo

Football: largest margin of victory - 149-0. Yes, you read that correct. On October 31, 2002, in Madagascar, AS Adema defeated SO l'Emyrne 149–0. But it wasn’t a legitimate result, as SO l'Emyrne intentionally lost the game by scoring own goals to protest against refereeing decisions. The record for a fair contest is held by Arbroath who beat Bon Accord 36–0 in Scotland on September 12, 1885, which is the largest validated winning margin in a professional football match. Image for representation / Alamy Stock Photo

Motorsport: biggest winning margin in an F1 race - two laps. This has happened twice in Formula One. Jackie Stewart (above) won the 1969 Spanish GP for Matra after lapping second placed Bruce McLaren twice to win be nearly four minutes. Then in 1995 Australian GP, only eight cars finished due to various incidents and Damon Hill won with Williams two laps ahead of Olivier Panis. Getty

NBA: most points by a player in a game - 100. Wilt Chamberlain set the single-game scoring record in NBA by scoring 100 points for the Philadelphia Warriors in a 169–147 win over the New York Knicks on March 2, 1962. It is widely considered the greatest record in basketball. Incredibly, the game was not televised and there is no video footage of the game. The next best effort is 81 by the late Kobe Bryant. Shutterstock

Squash: most consecutive wins - 555. Pakistan squash legend Jahangir Khan owns the greatest records in sport - winning 555 matches in a row during an unbeaten run from 1981 to 1986, according to various sources. However, some statisticians have questioned the accuracy of the record, claiming the longest winning run should go to Dutch wheelchair tennis legend Esther Vergeer, who won 470 consecutive matches over 10 years until her retirement in 2013. Getty

NFL: most individual points in a game – 40. It’s the oldest standing NFL record. Hall of Famer Ernie Nevers scored six touchdowns and kicked four extra points for all 40 Chicago Cardinals points in a 40-6 victory against Chicago Bears on November 28, 1929. Shutterstock

Golf: most consecutive cuts made - 142. Arguably the greatest record in golf. Tiger Woods holds the all-time PGA Tour record for most consecutive cuts made, with 142. The streak started in 1998 and continued until 2005. The next players on the list are Byron Nelson with 113 and Jack Nicklaus at 105. Getty

MLB: fastest pitch in baseball history - 105.1 mph. On September 24, 2010, Cincinnati Reds pitcher Aroldis Chapman’s pitch to San Diego Padres Tony Gwynn Jr. was clocked at an incredible 105.1 mph. It is the fastest recorded pitch in baseball and experts believe a human body is almost certainly incapable of hurling a ball any faster. Getty

Tennis: longest match in history -Wimbledon 2010. Even the term marathon fails to depict just how excruciatingly long the 2010 Wimbledon match between American John Isner (above) and French qualifier Nicolas Mahut was. In total, the match took 11 hours and 5 minutes of play over three days, with a final score of 6–4, 3–6, 6–7, 7–6, 70–68 for a total of 183 games. It is by far the longest match in tennis history. The final set alone was longer than the previous longest match. The rules have since been changed so it can never be beaten.

Cricket: most deliveries for a duck - 77. Geoff Alott of New Zealand has faced the most number of deliveries before getting out for zero. The fast bowler faced 77 balls against South Africa in 1999 at the Auckland Test. Allsport

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